Head Rush Tech Blog
zip line experience

Top 5 Concerns Riders Have About Their First Zip Line Experience

If you are a zip line operator or guide, you may have forgotten what it’s like to be new to zip lining, the excitement and the anxiety that many first time guests feel.  When trying to improve the zip line experience, it’s important to think about all experience levels and abilities.  Think about the questions, worries, or concerns that your first time zip liners will have compared to someone who has zip lined many times before.

Here are some of the most common things riders think about before or during their first zip line experience.  Are you able to provide the best answers to these questions?

 

How do I stop on the zip line?

This is one of the most common first questions that zip line riders will ask their guides about the zip line experience.  They are excited to fly down the line, sure, but they also know that something has to happen at the end of the line.  That something is one of the most critical parts of zip line safety, so it’s understandable that riders want to know what to expect.

There are a variety of different zip line braking methods, and braking can be either active (requiring action from the rider) or passive (braking that happens automatically with no participant involvement).  If your zip line involves passive braking, then you can immediately put your riders at ease by telling them they don’t have to do anything to brake at the end of the line and that braking will occur automatically.

 

What if I forget something or mess it up?

Similarly, if it is someone’s first zip line experience, they will be thinking about all the details, signals, and actions they may have to remember.  That’s no fun!  Your zip line guests should be thinking about the excitement and scenery of the ride.

If you have a zipSTOP Zip Line Brake on your lines, you will luckily be able to tell your riders to sit back and enjoy the view.  They won’t have to worry about when or how to brake, and the zip line guides will take care of the rest.  No more worries for your guests about forgetting important details or doing something wrong.

 

What do I hold on to?

It’s natural for your zip line riders to want to hold on to something as they go down the line.  Some zip lines have riders put their hands on top of the zip line trolley, but this can increase the risk of someone pinching (or worse) their finger between the trolley and the line.  Other zip lines have long lanyard where guests usually grip.  This is an ok option.

The best option is to have a zip line trolley handle.  This gives an obvious place for your riders to hold on to.  Plus, the handle will feel more secure for them as they cruise down the line.  The LightSpeed Impact Trolley features a handle accessory that sits well below the trolley and the line to keep hands out of the way and prevent pinching.

 

Can I control my orientation?

Nothing is more distracting for a zip line rider than rotating uncontrollably as they go down the line.  You want to look around and enjoy the view but keep turning this way and that!  This is just one more reason to add a zip line trolley handle.  Riders feel in control and won’t end up riding your line backwards, which can be disconcerting and potentially unsafe when they enter the braking zone.  It’s an easy accessory to add that dramatically improves the rider’s zip line experience.

 

Will you take our photo?

Hopefully the tour ends and this is the final question from your guests.  If so, that means they want to remember and share their zip line experience, and it’s a sign that they had a great time.  Be ready for these opportunities and think about a good location at the end of the tour where you can take group photos.  Make sure there is some signage that features your tour name and location so it can be in the photo.

If you can confidently answer each of these questions, your zip line is on its way to providing an excellent rider experience.  Learn more about designing an outstanding zip line and what goes into the brake system to make the best rider experience and to increase throughput.

Jenna Stadsvold